jehnnybeth:

Artwork for ‘Words to the Blind’ blows my mind each time I look at it - by Antoine Carlier @popnoirerecords

jehnnybeth:

Artwork for ‘Words to the Blind’ blows my mind each time I look at it - by Antoine Carlier @popnoirerecords

mizufae:

pastel-gizibe:

shannonwest:

equalityandthecity:

(via Students help Emma Sulkowicz carry mattress to class in first collective carry)

Y E S 

IT IS GETTING BETTER

When I first read about this woman’s plan I thought it was a strong idea but I was worried that it was a little bit much for one person, no matter how dedicated, to keep it up for too long, especially since she has, you know, college to commit to. I never thought about how, if other people helped her carry her burden, I never thought about how much it would look like pallbearers with a coffin. Which is simply one of the strongest visual symbols one can use to disturb people in the western world.

mizufae:

pastel-gizibe:

shannonwest:

equalityandthecity:

(via Students help Emma Sulkowicz carry mattress to class in first collective carry)

Y E S 

IT IS GETTING BETTER

When I first read about this woman’s plan I thought it was a strong idea but I was worried that it was a little bit much for one person, no matter how dedicated, to keep it up for too long, especially since she has, you know, college to commit to. I never thought about how, if other people helped her carry her burden, I never thought about how much it would look like pallbearers with a coffin. Which is simply one of the strongest visual symbols one can use to disturb people in the western world.

ohrobbybaby:

Bolero | Maurice Ravel 

aleyma:

John Singer Sargent, Arab Woman, 1905-06 (source).

aleyma:

John Singer Sargent, Arab Woman, 1905-06 (source).

9emeart:

Corto dans Corto Maltese
Hugo Pratt

9emeart:

Corto dans Corto Maltese

Hugo Pratt

blackeyedangel:

new music from the app
ONE fucking hour
 
of new things
I am very happy

freundevonfreunden:

Ebru: The Art of Marbling

Marbling is an intricate technique that artist use to create patterns reminiscent of the surface of natural marble. A variety of inks floats on water and is mixed with the help of specialist tools.

In this video, filmmaker Oguz Uygur captures his father while he’s masterfully working on different marblings.

This visually captivating process is even more enjoyable than the final result.

xlrecordings:

Watch Jack White performing The Same Boy You’ve Always Known and Entitlement for La Blogotheque’s Take Away Shows.

likeafieldmouse:

J. M. W. Turner - Vignette Studies (1835-6)

thecreatorsproject:

Radiohead’s PolyFauna App Gets Updated With New Music, Unreleased Thom Yorke Vocals

Read More

fleurdulys:

The First Birthday - Plinio Nomellini
1914

fleurdulys:

The First Birthday - Plinio Nomellini

1914

giuliabeck:

So, let me tell you about this handsome gentleman on this fine September 27th, which happens to be his birthday.

Lothar von Richthofen was said to be a “delicate child”, but as most fragile things in this world, he grew into a complete badass. At the break out of WWI, he served his country at the frontier as a horseman. Like most horsemen, he went through a lot of bullshit. Like, a lot of bullshit. Besides starvation and disease, our brave Lothar endured endless rainy nights on horseback, having nothing but his sweet sister Ilse’s letter to comfort him - before they melted away with the water, of course.

Let’s not forget that, alongside all that, there were hundreds of enemy soldiers at every corner wanting nothing more than to shoot a German. Tough times, ladies and gents, tough times.

Thankfully, once his brother Manfred von Ricthofen (yes, the Red Baron) showed him how promising aerial combat could be, Lothar abandoned the filthy and bloody land for a much cleaner (yet just as bloody) environment. He then became a proud Luftwaffe pilot!

 It is nearly impossible to speak about one brother without mentioning the other; their bond is, sincerely, unique. As it is described by their mother in her War Diary, “Lothar loved Manfred more than himself”. 

Lothar is often depicted as the “envious brother”, which is more than an unfair assumption! As Kunigunde von Ricthofen’s description of her sons goes on, she mentions how “he knew no envy” and how glad he was about that. His solemn mantra was “Manfred is always right”.

After Manfred’s tragic death in April 1918, Lothar found himself rather lost. He married in June in 1919 as had children years later. Regardless, our hero was showing signs of depression and in 1922, a few weeks after his divorce (note that around that time divorces were still rather rare) he died in an aerial accident given to an engine fail.

Regardless of an unfair end, I think we should all keep Lothar von Richthofen in mind – a man who, like so few of us, dedicated his life to his brother in blind loyalty. Give worth to your sibling; there is no one else like him/her.